TrainObsolete 1860's $20.00 First National Bank of Idaho, Boise City, "Idaho Territory" PCGS 50 About New

Obsolete Note Territoral

Most Obsolete Notes are over 140 years old and were considered "worthless" after the banks failed or converted to National Bank Notes. As a result, most Obsolete Notes were tossed or destroyed, creating huge demand and value for those that have survived. In addition to the rarity of Obsolete Notes, collectors are drawn to Obsolete Notes because they have amazingly diverse vignettes; everything from Goddesses to Santa Claus. Obsolete Note collectors often collect by theme such as groupings by state, city, or almost any other compilation, limited only my imagination.

For a List of Obsolete Note Categories, Click Here

If you have any questions call Jeff @ 870-670-4255

Published in Idaho

Why the “Lazy Deuce” holds the number four position among the top 100 greatest American Currency Notes!

See the 2 examples on this page:

 http://www.treasuredstocks.com/currency/national-bank-notes/new-york.html 

For those of us who collect coins and currency, it is no surprise that the rare and ornately stunning “Lazy Deuce” is placed among the top five of America’s most fascinating currency notes. It’s just historically exquisite!

Bowers and Sundman (Whitman Publishing, Atlanta, GA) began writing their outstanding book “100 Greatest American Currency Notes” by surveying the leading and widely diverse group of currency dealers. These authors asked each dealer to list what they believed to be the top American currency notes. The results, along with photos and descriptions, of this survey are included in their book. To no surprise, our beloved “Lazy Deuce” (page 26) is fourth among the most fascinating notes we American collectors have ever seen! And here’s why…

The Lazy Deuce National Bank Note

The word “Deuce” is a Latin word meaning “two.” We use it as slang when playing cards, sports, buying trucks/motorcycles, or showing the “V” for victory. We also use it to denote an amazing piece of currency with a distinctive “2”. This number 2 is “lazy” because it is reclining lazily (horizontal) on its side, just above the name of the National Bank (instead of being positioned upright and vertical). Additionally, that tilted 2 is huge, spreading across over half of the note’s width.

The Lazy Deuce first appeared as large size nationals during America’s Civil War, when National Bank Note currency was introduced to help finance Northern interests. Prior to this introduction, the federal government issued coins but basically allowed states to finance and circulate their own currency. Additionally, to help thwart numerical alterations on bank notes, one method was to print hugely oversized horizontal numbers (e.g. the 2,3,5, etc.) across the note’s front or face.

But the huge “lazy” 2 isn’t the only stunning feature on Lazy Deuce currency! In addition to the number 2, you’ll see an engraved woman holding the American Flag (engraved by Louis Delnoce, titled “Stars & Stripes”), an extremely important patriotic symbol during the war. On the note’s reverse side, also engraved by L. Delnoce, appears a remake of the painting “Sir Walter Raleigh Presenting Corn & Tobacco to the English.” The issuing state’s seal and an eagle with shield are also shown. The exquisitely engraved “green backs” some say is the origin of the slang expression by the same name!

There are basically about seven types of Lazy Deuce notes with Frieberg numbers between 387-393. The most rare with the highest grades are in enormous demand, especially among private collectors! Why? Because not only are they rare, but their eye appeal is vast because of the “Sir Walter Raleigh…” and the “Stars & Stripes” vignettes of master engraver Louis Delnoce as well as the state’s (or territorial) seal of the bank of issue.

Indeed, the “Lazy Deuce” has earned its number four position among America’s most famous, and most collected currency notes. Come see our assortment of Lazy Deuce items at Treasuredstocks.com. We look forward to helping you build your amazing collection!

Article by Linda Smith

 

http://www.treasuredstocks.com/currency.html

If you have any questions call Jeff @ 870-670-4255

Published in Currency News
Friday, 05 August 2011 21:13

England Supports the South in Civil War

England was the world’s major market for cotton, and England paid in gold. At the beginning of the Civil War, the American South produced 80% of the world’s cotton, most of it sold to England for it mills. All the South had to do was send its cotton to England, get paid in gold and its currency would be as good as gold. Having plenty of cotton, the CSA and several Southern states backed their currency with cotton.

Most CSA currency carried the line “ Six months after the ratification of a treaty of peace between the Confederates States and the United States, the Confederate States of America will pay (value) dollars to the bearer of this note.” Later, this was extended to “two years,” the idea being, once the war was over, the CSA would sell its stored cotton and have the gold needed to meet its currency obligations.

http://www.treasuredstocks.com/currency.html

If you have any questions call Jeff @ 870-670-4255

Published in Currency News
Tuesday, 28 June 2011 18:52

Obsolete Notes

Most Obsolete Notes are over 140 years old and were considered "worthless" after the banks represented in the note failed or converted to National Banks. As a result, most Obsolete Notes were tossed or destroyed, creating huge demand and value for those that have survived. As a result, counterfeiting Obsolete Notes was and continues to be a big business and several of the Obsolete Note examples still surviving are actually Counterfeits. In addition to the rarity of notes, collectors are drawn to Obsolete Notes because they have amazingly diverse vignettes  -- everything from Goddesses to Santa Claus. Obsolete Note collectors often collect by theme. In addition to depicted vignettes, common collection themes include groupings by state, city, signature(s), or almost any other compilation, limited only my imagination.

http://www.treasuredstocks.com/currency.html

If you have any questions call Jeff @ 870-670-4255

Published in Currency News
Monday, 27 June 2011 15:47

Confederate Currency

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, the recently recognized Confederate government began to issue currency as legal tender to the populace of the South. The risk was that if the South won the war, the money would be exchangeable. The very first currency from the Government of the Confederate States of America was issued in April of 1861. The notes were issued on through 1864. Almost every Confederate note was painstakingly hand signed and numbered. It is not uncommon for these notes to have uneven, or rough borders since scissors or shears were used to hastily cut the sheets of notes apart.

Counterfeiting became a major problem for the South. The North played a big role in this action by printing counterfeit notes and distributing them in the South causing massive inflation. As the end of the war got closer, Southern citizens lost all confidence in the Confederate currency. Bartering, and the black-market Northern "greenbacks" took over as main forms of exchange for goods and services. By the end of the war, Confederate notes were totally worthless.

Today, the value of these notes is far from worthless. Their prices range from under one hundred dollars for the most common and heavily printed series, to the tens of thousands for the rarest. Most of the heavily printed issues are still available to some extent, while the less common series are getting extremely hard to find. One thing is certain though, all Confederate currency makes as a good investment and has shown to steadily increase in value over the years.

As a collector and dealer of Confederate and Obsolete currency, I view these notes as a glimpse into a fascinating part of our nation's history. My desire to collect began when I realized the great opportunity to own currency that was once used by soldiers and civilians alike during that tragic war.

Take a look through our site to find many examples of Confederate and States notes available for purchase. Whether you are an experienced collector, or just looking to obtain your first piece of paper money history, I am sure you will find something of interest. With the 150th anniversary of the Civil War just around the corner, right now makes a great time to acquire your first note, or add more notes to your collection.

http://www.treasuredstocks.com/currency.html

If you have any questions call Jeff @ 870-670-4255

Published in Currency News
Tuesday, 19 April 2011 23:15

Fractional Currency

Fractional Currency

Fractional Currency, also known as fractionals, is a term used by currency collectors to identify a note with a face value of less than (a fraction of) one U. S. Dollar. During the Civil War, coins were very scarce, a problem made worse by metal shortages and public hoarding. Coins were so scarce that merchants couldn’t make change for their customers. Consequently, starting in 1862, the US Government issued paper fractionals in 3, 5, 10, 15, 25 and 50 cent denominations. Fractional Currency notes have dates ranging from 1862 (the Civil War) to 1876. Notes could be exchanged for face value in postage stamps. An interesting controversy occurred when the first Superintendent of the National Currency Bureau (now known as the Bureau of Engraving & Printing – BEP) Spencer M. Clark printed his picture on the 5 cent note. It is now only legal to portray persons of distinction on currency following their death, plus at least two years. Imagine that such a controversy occurred over a five cent fractional note!

Because of their significance in US history and policy, Fractional Currency notes have become increasingly collectable and valuable.

We can help you build your Fractional Currency Collection!


http://www.treasuredstocks.com/currency.html

If you have any questions call Jeff @ 870-670-4255


Published in Currency News

Payment Methods

Payment can be made by clicking on the Buy Now button, which accepts credit cards such as Amex, MasterCard, and Visa.

You may also contact us to make payment using personal checks, money orders, cashiers checks, and wire transfers.

Shipping Details

We ship to the top collectors throughout the United States and the world. Every shipment is insured. Please note that an extra charge may be added for an oversea shipment.

Return Policy

We are proud of our items and make a serious effort to display each individual product accurately. Any purchased item that does not match or exceed your expectation may be returned for merchandise credit or a full refund.

Our Address

TreasuredStocks.com
1605 Michigan Ave.
Horseshoe Bend, AR 72512
870-670-4255
jeff@treasuredstocks.com

Hide Footer